Who can receive a dependant supplement?

A dependant supplement is a means-test supplement to pensions. It is granted to people receiving a pension who provide for a spouse and/or children, and who have a total income under a certain level. Old-age pensioners must have turned 67 and receive a full retirement pension to be entitled to a dependant supplement.

The dependant supplement is means-tested against the income of the spouse/child provided for and against the pensioner's own income. The spouse who is provided for cannot receive his/her own retirement pension or be entitled to a full retirement pension. A child supplement for children who live with both of their parents is means-tested against the income of both parents.

Child supplement

  • Old-age pensioners who have turned 67 and receive a full pension may receive a child supplement if the child/children they provide for does not have an income that exceeds the basic amount.
  • People on disability pension may receive a child supplement if the child/children they provide for does not have an income that exceeds the basic amount.
  • Even though both parents are receiving a pension, only one of them may receive a child supplement.
  • A child supplement is not granted to recipients of contractual pensions.

Spouse supplement

  • Old-age pensioners who have turned 67 and receive a full pension may receive a spouse supplement if the spouse does not receive a national insurance pension, is not entitled to a full national insurance retirement pension, and does not have an income that exceeds the basic amount. A spouse supplement cannot be granted if the spouse receives either a contractual private sector pension that was granted before 1 January 2011 or a contractual public sector pension.
  • Pensioners with a contractual pension who receive a contractual pension calculated by the national insurance, i.e. contractual public sector pension or "old contractual pension" from the private sector, may receive a spouse supplement, following the same rules as for old-age pensioners, but only for a spouse over the age of 60 who is provided for.
  • People on disability pension may receive a dependant supplement for spouses over the age of 60 who do not receive a national insurance pension, are not entitled to a full national insurance retirement pension, and who do not have an income that exceeds the basic amount. A spouse supplement cannot be granted if the spouse receives either a contractual private sector pension that was granted before 1 January 2011 or a contractual public sector pension. If the spouse is under the age of 60, a spouse supplement can only be granted if there are special reasons that do not allow the spouse to provide for him/herself.
  • A spouse supplement can also be granted for cohabitating partners if the couple have children together or have been married in the past.

How do you apply?

A dependant supplement is a means-tested benefit. It is therefore important that you provide as accurate and correct information as possible about your earned income. You will get a faster reply if you collect the information NAV needs to process the application.

Documentation you should enclose with your application:

  • Documentation of own earned income
  • Documentation of your spouse's/partner's earned income
  • Documentation of children's earned income

Your dependant supplement will be paid together with your pension every month.

How much will you receive?

A full spouse/child supplement will be set for old-age pensioners as follows:

  • A full spouse supplement corresponds to 25 % of the lowest pension level at a high rate
  • A full child supplement corresponds to 20 % of the lowest pension level at a high rate for each child

A full spouse/child supplement will be set for people on a disability pension as follows:

  • A full spouse supplement corresponds to 50 % of the basic amount.
  • A full child supplement corresponds to 40 % of the basic amount for each child.

The following also applies to old-age pensioners and people receiving a disability pension:

  • The dependant supplements are reduced by 50 % of your income above an exemption amount that is set every year.
  • When a person is entitled to a child supplement for children who live with both parents, both parents' income must be calculated in accordance with specific rules.
  • The dependant supplements will also be reduced if the recipient has a reduced period of national insurance cover.

For people who receive a contractual private sector pension granted before 1 January 2011 or contractual public sector pension, the spouse supplement will be calculated using the same rules that apply to old-age pensioners.

If you move abroad

If you still are entitled to a national insurance pension after moving to another country, you may also be entitled to a dependant supplement.

Report changes

Changes in your income, family situation and/or work situation may affect the payment you receive from the Norwegian Labour and Welfare Administration. Stays abroad may also affect your payment.  You must therefore immediately report any such changes to your local NAV office.

Most of the main information about your entitlements and duties is available here in English. There are also links to other more detailed information; however, some of this information is only available in Norwegian.

Payments

See Payment dates, holiday pay and tax withholding.

You can also check your payments on the Your payments service.


Most of the information is available here in English. There are also links to other more detailed information; however, some of this information is only available in Norwegian.